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2023 Year Round  |  2022 Summer  |  2023 Flexible Enrollment

Year Round:   June 14, 2022 - June 30, 2023 - ACDP
Registration: June 14, 2022 - May 31, 2023
Student Success (Online Orientation)

Prerequisite: None
Credit Requirement Area: N/A
Course Description: In this non-credit orientation course, students will learn what it takes to be a successful online learner and how to successfully complete CT AVHS online courses. It is designed to show students what an online course is like and to provide students with opportunities to try out practice assignments, quizzes and a discussion board. Students will become familiar with the concept of online learning, learn to navigate the Blackboard learning system, understand the CT AVHS program, and explore study tools and tips to be a successful online student. This course is required each year for students.

Year Round:   June 14, 2022 - June 30, 2023 - GED
Registration: June 14, 2022 - May 31, 2023
Preparation for the Accuplacer®: Math

The Accuplacer Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the content dimensions addressed on the Next-Generation Accuplacer tests. Each unit in the Accuplacer Math course aligns to multiple content dimensions on the Accuplacer Math Test. This course consists of three units that will help you identify your mathematical strengths and weaknesses and polish your math skills. The first unit focuses on basic arithmetic concepts such as operations with rational numbers and decimals. The second unit introduces you to topics such as the use of variables to solve equations, inequalities, and algebraic expressions, and the application of geometric formulas to solve problems. The third unit will help improve your skills in solving algebraic equations and inequalities, interpreting polynomial functions, and using trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem. The course’s tests will help you practice what you have learned.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the Accuplacer®: Reading

The Accuplacer Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the content dimensions addressed on the Next-Generation Accuplacer tests. Each unit in the Accuplacer Reading course aligns to multiple content dimensions in the Accuplacer Reading Test. This course focuses on reading strategies and vocabulary skills for literary, informational, and historical texts. This course consists of six units that will help you to identify your reading and literacy strengths and weaknesses and to polish your reading skills. The first two units introduce you to the elements of fiction and poetry. The third unit discusses the basic characteristics of novels and explores conflicts in novels. The fourth unit focuses on nonfiction. It reviews writing structures in informational texts, discusses how to do a close reading of nonfiction text, and explores essays and speeches. The fifth unit examines the characteristics and purpose of informational text. The last unit analyzes historical American texts. The course’s tests will help you practice what you have learned.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the Accuplacer®: Writing

The Accuplacer Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the content dimensions addressed on the Next-Generation Accuplacer tests. Each unit in the Accuplacer Writing course aligns to multiple content dimensions in the Accuplacer Writing Test. This course consists of three units designed to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses in writing and to develop and polish your writing skills. It develops organizational skills, grammar skills, and writing strategies. The first unit introduces you to points of view, themes, and conflicts in poetry, memoirs, and informational texts. The second unit focuses on writing strategies through the exploration of identity, characters, point of view, and word choice. The third unit discusses the main idea in informational texts, cause and effect in literary nonfiction and develops writing skills such as organizing, drafting, and editing. This course’s tests will help you practice what you have learned.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the GED®: Mathematics

The Preparation for the GED® Test Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the strands and topics that are assessed on the GED® Test. Each unit aligns to one or more strands within the GED® Test and the modules within each unit target the individual indicators on the test. The GED® Test for Math is the study of both numerical and algebraic problem-solving skills. In this course, you will find a variety of lessons and activities to improve your knowledge and skills in these areas.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the GED®: Reading Language Arts

The Preparation for the GED® Test Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the strands and topics that are assessed on the GED® Test. Each unit aligns to one or more strands within the GED® Test and the modules within each unit target the individual indicators on the test. The GED® Test for Reading Language Arts is the study of different reading and writing strategies. In this course, you will find a variety of lessons and activities to improve your knowledge of these strategies.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the GED®: Science

The Preparation for the GED® Test Courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the content subtopics and practices that are aligned to each GED® Test. Each lesson or activity aligns to one or more of the GED® content subtopics or practices. The units are organized by content area. This course is designed to develop the science-content competencies necessary to successfully engage in scientific reasoning in the life sciences, physical sciences, and Earth and space sciences. This course emphasizes the use of the scientific reasoning skills and practices needed for scientific literacy.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the GED®: Social Studies

The Preparation for the GED® Test courses were developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the content subtopics and practices that are aligned to each GED® Test. Each lesson or activity aligns to one or more of the GED® content subtopics or practices. The units are organized by content area. This course is designed to develop the social studies-content competencies necessary to successfully engage in reasoning within the areas of civics, government, US history, and economics. This course emphasizes the use of the social studies reasoning skills and practices needed for social studies literacy.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the SAT®: Mathematics

The SAT Mathematics course was developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the strands and topics that are assessed on the 2016 SAT. Each unit aligns to one or more topics within the 2016 SAT. This course focuses on the study of algebraic problemsolving skills and concepts related to geometry, probability, and statistics. In this course, you’ll find a variety of lessons and activities to improve your knowledge and skills in these areas.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the SAT®: Reading

The SAT Reading course was developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the topics assessed on the 2016 SAT. Each unit aligns to one or more topics within the 2016 SAT. This course focuses on the study of different reading strategies and vocabulary skills for fictional, informational, and persuasive texts. In this course, you will find a variety of lessons and activities to enhance your knowledge of these strategies.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Preparation for the SAT®: Writing

The SAT Writing Course was developed by aligning Plato Courseware with the topics that are assessed on the 2016 SAT. Each unit aligns to one or more topics within the 2016 SAT. This course focuses on the study of different writing strategies and language skills. In this course, you will find a variety of lessons and activities to enhance your knowledge of these strategies.

*OLC's please contact Bill Burnes (wburnes@charteroak.edu) to create your specific LEA course shell.

View the Weekly Schedule.

Summer:   July 5, 2022 - September 2, 2022 - ACDP
Registration: June 20, 2022 - July 8, 2022
All of the following Academic Courses are ½ Credit. (If a student needs a full credit course, please sign up for Session 1 and Session 2 of the respective course during the session 1 registration period.)
Contemporary Issues 1: National Affairs

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course will explore current national issues and how they affect society. Students will develop their critical thinking skills as they explore topics including the death penalty, obesity, and immigration. Throughout the course, students will have ample opportunities to develop and further their knowledge of these topics, as well as discuss their own ideas, opinions, beliefs, and solutions. As a culminating activity, the students will complete an independent inquiry project on the national topic of their choice.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Contemporary Literature 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on the non-fiction book Winterdance by Gary Paulsen. The second three weeks focuses on the novel The Big Burn by Jeanette Ingold. Students will explore background knowledge to connect with the settings of the stories. Students will participate in discussions on the readings and answer written questions using evidence from the text. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Foundations of Real World Math: Session 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is a Pre-Algebra course which provides students with methods to strengthen their foundations of Pre-Algebra skills and concepts in order to prepare them for Algebra 1. This course is the first half of Foundations of Real World Math and focuses on number properties, greatest common factor, least common multiple, integer operations, exponent basics, order of operations, fractions operations, and decimal operations. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Foundations of Real World Math: Session 2

Prerequisite: Foundations of Real World Math: Session 1

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is a Pre-Algebra course which provides students with methods to strengthen their foundations of Pre-Algebra skills and concepts in order to prepare them for Algebra 1. This course is the second half of Foundations of Real World Math and focuses on ratios, proportions, percentages, stem and leaf plots, bar charts, box and whisker plots, pie charts, pictographs, and measures of central tendency for a data set. This course will culminate with a Final Exam. This course is for students that have taken and successfully passed the first half of Foundations of Real World Math.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Introduction to Allied Health

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with an overview of different types of health care organizations and facilities, the general organizational structure of a health care organizations, the members of the health care team and how they interact to serve the patient, the scope of practice, general anatomy and physiology, and medical terminology. Students will also be able to differentiate between licensure, certification and degrees, and the wide variety of health care professions in the industry. As a culminating activity, the students will complete an independent report on two medical positions they may wish to pursue in the future.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Life Management Skills 1: Self Esteem & Communication

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Life skills help people make responsible and informed choices and can promote healthy lifestyles as well as career skills. The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the roles, responsibilities, and relationships essential to functional families and to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships within family and individual units. The life skills focused on in this course will include self-development and learning about self-esteem, awareness, resilience, decreasing stress, understanding one’s values and motivation, learning to problem solve, listen and effectively communicate. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Life Management Skills 2: Goal Setting & Decision Making

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Life skills help people make responsible and informed choices and can promote healthy lifestyles as well as career skills. The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the roles, responsibilities, and relationships essential to functional families and to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships within family and individual units. The life skills focused on in this course will include goal setting, decision-making processes, recognizing cognitive biases, nudges, trying behavior changes, understanding our habits, establishing trust, team building and learning the value of coaching. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Modern Literature 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. The second three weeks focuses on Big Mouth and Ugly Girl by Joyce Carol Oates. Students will identify literary devices, such as imagery, and strengthen reading comprehension skills by identifying types of conflicts that drive the plot, such as internal and external conflicts. Students will analyze the texts and apply their understanding by answering critical thinking questions. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.

Flexible Enrollment:   September 6, 2022 - May 26, 2023 - ACDP
Registration: August 22, 2022 - March 17, 2023
All of the following Academic Courses are ½ Credit. (If a student needs a full credit course, please sign up for Session 1 and Session 2 of the respective course during the session 1 registration period.)
Algebra 1: Session 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve fundamental mathematical problems. This course is the first half of Algebra 1 and covers a range of algebraic topics such as setting up and solving linear equations, graphing, finding linear relations, solving systems of equations, and working with polynomials. More importantly, this course is intended to provide you with a solid foundation for the rest of your math courses. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Algebra 1: Session 2

Prerequisite: Algebra 1: Session 1

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve fundamental mathematical problems. This course is the second half of Algebra 1 and covers a range of algebraic topics such as factoring, working with rational and radical expressions, solving rational and radical equations, solving quadratic equations, and working with functions. More importantly, this course is intended to provide you with a solid foundation for the rest of your math courses. This course will culminate with a Final Exam. This course is for students that have taken and successfully passed the first half of Algebra 1.

View the Weekly Schedule.
America at War & Music 1: The Two World Wars

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: Students will explore the two most significant events of the twentieth century: World War I and World War II. Throughout the course, students will learn about the significant figures, encounters, social events and political scenes that brought about these destructive encounters that swallowed the Northern Hemisphere and areas beyond. In addition, students will discover how the ramifications of each major event avalanched, and in due time led to further struggles. Furthermore, students will apply their knowledge of these epic events to analyze numerous songs from each of the World War eras. These songs will give the students a remarkable glimpse into the collective mind and heart of an America that for the first time was asserting itself as the global power it is today. Finally, the songs will allow the students to step back in time to ascertain the cultural scene of an America locked in war.

View the Weekly Schedule.
America at War & Music 2: Vietnam to Iraq

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course explores America's most recent military conflicts including The Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War, and the more recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Students will conduct a comprehensive review of the significant figures, encounters, social events, and political scenes that gave birth to these armed conflicts over the past quarter century. In addition, students will apply their knowledge of these highly discussed and often controversial events to analyze numerous songs which reflect upon, and sometimes criticize America's involvement in these conflicts. These songs will provide a fantastic insight into the revolutionary culture that sprang up in America during their parents' generation as conformity gave way to an America that was more willing to challenge the status quo.

View the Weekly Schedule.
American Government/Civics 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course will take students through a journey of American Government. The journey begins with a trip through Washington, D.C. and the White House. Students will then explore the process of becoming a citizen, including the responsibilities of participating in a democracy. From there, students will learn about the purpose and structure of government and take a detailed look at some of our Founding Fathers and their contributions to building our nation. Students will learn about The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, as well as the three branches of government established by the Constitution. Finally, students will learn about the Bill of Rights and the amendment process. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to explore and reflect on their core beliefs regarding democracy, our government, and how our government works. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
American Government/Civics 2

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course will take students through a journey of American Government. The journey begins with a trip through Washington, D.C. and the White House. Students will then explore our political party system and examine interest groups and their influence on American politics. From there, students will learn about the people working in local, state, and national government.  Finally, students will explore the state and federal court system, as well as some of the more famous court cases in American history. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to explore and reflect on their core beliefs regarding democracy, our government, and how our government works. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Art Appreciation

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Arts

Course Description: This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. In this course, students will be able to interpret works of art; explain the processes involved in artistic production; identify the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic issues that artists examine in their work; and explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and world cultures.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Biology 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Science

Course Description: Biology is a branch of science that deals with living organisms and their vital processes. Biology literally means "the study of life". This course encompasses an overview of cell, cell division, reactions and enzymes, biological energy, cellular metabolism and fermentation, as well as photosynthesis. There will also be an overview of ecology and biodiversity. Students will complete a variety of lab interactives throughout the course to further their understanding of plasma membranes, respiration, photosynthesis, and succession.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Biology 2

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Science

Course Description: Biology is a branch of science that deals with living organisms and their vital processes. Biology literally means "the study of life". This course encompasses an overview of reproduction at the cellular level, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, and the diversity of life especially those of the animal kingdom. Students will complete a variety of lab interactives throughout the course to further their understanding of mitosis, DNA, and evolution. Students will also complete a research lab on animal classification.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Cellphone Photography

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Arts

Course Description: In this course, students will learn art elements and design principles of photography, along with creative techniques to take shots directly with a cellphone’s camera. When comparing traditional photography to the cellphone camera, both create high-quality images however vary in costs, processing, and accessibility. Using traditional film cameras is less costly, however the development and processing of the film negatives take more time and limits the number of editing options. The cellphone cameras have a higher initial cost for the phone, however the technology continues to improve and allows for quick accessibility to editing and sharing your images. While the cellphone camera is now one of the most widely used, getting the best results takes a bit of practice and patience. Within each assignment, students undertake to explore the distinct qualities of taking photos with a cellphone while engaging with the history, language, and context of the photographic medium. Please keep in mind that students will need access to their cellphone cameras and the ability to connect the images to the assignments using their computer via Wi-Fi, cord, or email.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Chemistry

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Science

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. The principles of chemistry were first identified, studied, and applied by ancient Egyptians in order to extract metal from ores, make alcoholic beverages, glaze pottery, turn fat into soap, and much more. What began as a quest to build better weapons or create potions capable of ensuring everlasting life has since become the foundation of modern science. Chemistry makes up almost everything you touch, see, and feel, from the shampoo you used this morning to the plastic container that holds your lunch. This course will cover matter and measurement, the atom, bonding, chemical formulas and equations, states of matter, and thermodynamics.

View the Weekly Schedule.
College Algebra

Prerequisite: Algebra 1: Session 1 & Algebra 1: Session 2

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course will benefit those students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 and would like to review Algebra concepts before transitioning to post-secondary schooling. This course will focus on Pre-Algebra concepts, solving linear inequalities and graphing, evaluating exponents and polynomials, factoring polynomials, and performing operations on rational expressions. This course will also help students prepare to take the Algebra portion of the ACCUPLACER College Entrance Test. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Contemporary Issues 1: National Affairs

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course will explore current national issues and how they affect society. Students will develop their critical thinking skills as they explore topics including the death penalty, obesity, and immigration. Throughout the course, students will have ample opportunities to develop and further their knowledge of these topics, as well as discuss their own ideas, opinions, beliefs, and solutions. As a culminating activity, the students will complete an independent inquiry project on the national topic of their choice.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Contemporary Issues 2: International Affairs

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: This course will explore current international issues and how they affect the global society. Students will develop their critical thinking skills as they explore topics including international aid, global warming, and the HIV/AIDS crisis. Throughout the course, students will have ample opportunities to develop and further their knowledge of these topics, as well as discuss their own ideas, opinions, beliefs, and solutions. As a culminating activity, the students will complete an independent inquiry project on the international topic of their choice.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Contemporary Literature 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on the non-fiction book Winterdance by Gary Paulsen. The second three weeks focuses on the novel The Big Burn by Jeanette Ingold. Students will explore background knowledge to connect with the settings of the stories. Students will participate in discussions on the readings and answer written questions using evidence from the text. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Contemporary Literature 2

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. The second three weeks focuses on The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty. Students will participate in discussions on the readings and answer written questions using evidence from the text. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Financial Literacy: Session 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course provides experience with real-world financial applications using mathematics.  Students will view their lives from a financial perspective and gain knowledge and awareness of materials available for making financially fit decisions going forward. This course is the first half of Financial Literacy and focuses on money management tips such as spending plans and budgets, borrowing basics such as credit and debt, and earning power such as career plans and benefits. Students will also compare buying and leasing a car. Students will complete spending and savings scenarios, activities from the FDIC, and case studies to reinforce concepts learned. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Financial Literacy: Session 2

Prerequisite: Financial Literacy: Session 1

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course provides experience with real-world financial applications using mathematics.  Students will view their lives from a financial perspective and gain knowledge and awareness of materials available for making financially fit decisions going forward. This course is the second half of Financial Literacy and focuses on investing, financial services, account types, managing your spending and savings, balancing a checkbook, keeping a check register, health and car insurance coverage, employee benefits and salary, taxes, and consumer protection. Students will complete an interview of a local employer, activities from the FDIC, and case studies to reinforce concepts learned. This course will culminate with a Final Exam. This course is for students that have taken and successfully passed the first half of Financial Literacy.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Foundations of Real World Math: Session 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is a Pre-Algebra course which provides students with methods to strengthen their foundations of Pre-Algebra skills and concepts in order to prepare them for Algebra 1. This course is the first half of Foundations of Real World Math and focuses on number properties, greatest common factor, least common multiple, integer operations, exponent basics, order of operations, fractions operations, and decimal operations. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Foundations of Real World Math: Session 2

Prerequisite: Foundations of Real World Math: Session 1

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is a Pre-Algebra course which provides students with methods to strengthen their foundations of Pre-Algebra skills and concepts in order to prepare them for Algebra 1. This course is the second half of Foundations of Real World Math and focuses on ratios, proportions, percentages, stem and leaf plots, bar charts, box and whisker plots, pie charts, pictographs, and measures of central tendency for a data set. This course will culminate with a Final Exam. This course is for students that have taken and successfully passed the first half of Foundations of Real World Math.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Geometry: Session 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 1: Session 1 & Algebra 1: Session 2

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is designed for students to use problem solving and real-world applications to gain the knowledge of geometric concepts and their practical uses. In geometry, we study the rules of the spaces and objects in our world. Geometry lets us make accurate predictions about the sizes of triangles, circles, and rectangles, which lets us calculate, design, and build. Geometry helps architects design studios, farmers buy the right amount of seeds for their land, engineers build houses, and pilots calculate the amount of time they need to fly to reach another city. We use geometry to calculate how much paint we need to buy to cover a wall and the exact angle we should use to launch a rocket to hit a distant target. In this course, we also study the relationships that exist between lines and angles. Urban planners study lines and angles to efficiently arrange houses, buildings, roads, and highways. Our street maps, water supply, and electrical connections all depend on these precise geometric calculations. How much space is inside a three-dimensional object? You may not realize you are using principles of geometry when you are getting ready for a trip and you need to calculate how to fit two adults, three kids, four suitcases, and a dog into your car. This course is the first half of Geometry and focuses on the basics of geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, congruence, triangle relationships, polygons, and quadrilaterals. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Geometry: Session 2

Prerequisite: Algebra 1: Session 1, Algebra 1: Session 2 & Geometry: Session 1

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: This course is designed for students to use problem solving and real-world applications to gain the knowledge of geometric concepts and their practical uses. In geometry, we study the rules of the spaces and objects in our world. Geometry lets us make accurate predictions about the sizes of triangles, circles, and rectangles, which lets us calculate, design, and build. Geometry helps architects design studios, farmers buy the right amount of seeds for their land, engineers build houses, and pilots calculate the amount of time they need to fly to reach another city. We use geometry to calculate how much paint we need to buy to cover a wall and the exact angle we should use to launch a rocket to hit a distant target. In this course, we also study the relationships that exist between lines and angles. Urban planners study lines and angles to efficiently arrange houses, buildings, roads, and highways. Our street maps, water supply, and electrical connections all depend on these precise geometric calculations. How much space is inside a three-dimensional object? You may not realize you are using principles of geometry when you are getting ready for a trip and you need to calculate how to fit two adults, three kids, four suitcases, and a dog into your car. This course is the second half of Geometry and focuses on similarity, right triangle trigonometry, circles, perimeter and area, and surface area and volume. This course will culminate with a Final Exam. This course is for students that have taken and successfully passed the first half of Geometry.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational Education

Course Description: Students will be provided with an overview of Advanced Manufacturing in their everyday life and what careers are possible with the skills learned in an Advanced Manufacturing program. This course focuses on Advanced Manufacturing in CT, types of manufacturing, industrial materials used in manufacturing, manufacturing processes, a brief overview of blueprints and diagrams, quality control processes, hazards and safety in manufacturing, and what will the future of advanced manufacturing might look like. Students will also learn about the CT State Community College Advanced Manufacturing Technology programs. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Introduction to Allied Health

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational Education

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with an overview of different types of health care organizations and facilities, the general organizational structure of a health care organizations, the members of the health care team and how they interact to serve the patient, the scope of practice, general anatomy and physiology, and medical terminology. Students will also be able to differentiate between licensure, certification and degrees, and the wide variety of health care professions in the industry. As a culminating activity, the students will complete an independent report on two medical positions they may wish to pursue in the future.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Introduction to Communications

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: This course is designed to help students understand, analyze, evaluate, describe, define, apply, and create methods of formal communication. Students will read assigned chapters focusing on types of communications, such as interpersonal and intrapersonal, as well as learn diction, such as synergy and dyad. Students also predict the outcomes of work-place scenarios based on communication styles and personalities of created characters. Students will apply learned communication strategies to past and future interactions. Also, students will analyze how those interactions may have turned out positive if they had used the new strategies they learned, such as listening with intent and purpose. By the end of this course, students will be able to successfully communicate in both their professional life and personal life. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Introduction to Nursing

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational Education

Course Description: This course introduces the student to basic concepts in professional nursing. The course focuses on nursing as a caring profession, nurse’s roles and functions, ethics, standards, legal aspects, health care delivery, and communication. Students will also explore basic medical terminology and an introduction to basic pharmacology.

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Life Management Skills 1: Self Esteem & Communication

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Life skills help people make responsible and informed choices and can promote healthy lifestyles as well as career skills. The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the roles, responsibilities, and relationships essential to functional families and to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships within family and individual units. The life skills focused on in this course will include self-development and learning about self-esteem, awareness, resilience, decreasing stress, understanding one’s values and motivation, learning to problem solve, listen and effectively communicate. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Life Management Skills 2: Goal Setting & Decision Making

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Life skills help people make responsible and informed choices and can promote healthy lifestyles as well as career skills. The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the roles, responsibilities, and relationships essential to functional families and to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships within family and individual units. The life skills focused on in this course will include goal setting, decision-making processes, recognizing cognitive biases, nudges, trying behavior changes, understanding our habits, establishing trust, team building and learning the value of coaching. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

View the Weekly Schedule.
Life Management Skills 3: Health & Wellness

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Life skills help people make responsible and informed choices and can promote healthy lifestyles as well as career skills. Nutrition, good exercise and adequate sleep are vital to this pursuit of health and wellness. But substance abuse, stress, mental health, and sexual health are critical, too, and can mean the difference between staying focused in life or deviating from your intended path of success. Employing safety measures on every level helps you be secure no matter where you are. Your health and wellbeing impact every aspect your life. The life skills focused on in this course will include healthy mind, body, exercise, nutrition, weight, sleep, substances, and sexual health. This course will culminate in a Final Project.

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Marine Science

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Science

Course Description: 70% of the surface of Planet Earth is covered by the ocean, which includes 97% of one of our most precious resources - water. 40% of the human population lives within 100 kilometers of the coast, yet we know more about the moon than the great depths of the sea. The ocean, the last great frontier, has 95% yet to be explored. In this course, students will learn how oceans operate and affect life on land. The first half of the course focuses on oceanography, plate tectonics, waves, tides, and currents. Students will investigate all the chemical and physical features of the oceans that in turn affect the biological features of the oceans. The second half of the course focuses on the various forms of life found in oceans from the microbial to marine mammals, as well as marine ecosystems. Throughout the course, students will explore climate change and our environmental impact on the oceans. This course will culminate with a Final Project.

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Math for Manufacturing

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math & Vocational Education

Course Description: Today’s business leaders are looking for flexible employees who can adapt to a work environment that is becoming more complex. These employers typically ask for workers who are good critical thinkers, excellent problem solvers, and can communicate clearly and concisely. They encourage their workers to take special training courses to stay current in their chosen fields of specialization. This course will help you develop and practice mathematics skills you will use on a job in manufacturing if you so choose to pursue this career in your future. This course focuses on decimals, fractions, tolerances, percentages, angles, triangles, shop problems, integers and rectangular coordinates, triangles and Pythagorean Theorem, and trigonometric functions. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

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Math for Trades

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Math

Course Description: The Math for Trades course represents the building blocks for math training. This course begins with review of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents and its use in the trades. This course continues with more challenging topics such as converting units and working with equations, perimeter, area, volume, the Pythagorean Theorem and its use in the trades. The material is presented from a trade perspective with easy-to-understand examples and video explanations accompanying the questions. The goal of this course is to get students prepared for the more advanced topics that they will encounter during their trade math education. This course will culminate with a Final Project.

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Media Literacy

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: This course focuses on techniques the media uses to deliver messages to audiences and elements within the messages. Students understand, identify, analyze, evaluate, create, and apply these techniques throughout the course. The students learn persuasion techniques, such as charisma and nostalgia, and learn the tools of media messaging, such as text vs. subtext. Students will also create their own media messages by making counter-ads. By the end of this course, students will understand the persuasion techniques the media uses and how audiences are targeted to achieve a goal. This course will culminate with a Final Project and Final Exam.

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Modern Literature 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. The second three weeks focuses on Big Mouth and Ugly Girl by Joyce Carol Oates. Students will identify literary devices, such as imagery, and strengthen reading comprehension skills by identifying types of conflicts that drive the plot, such as internal and external conflicts.  Students will analyze the texts and apply their understanding by answering critical thinking questions. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

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Modern Literature 2

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: Students will read two different novels for this course. The first three weeks focuses on The Samurai Shortstop by Alan Gratz. The second three weeks focuses on Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer.  Students will identify literary devices, such as foreshadowing, similes, and metaphors, and strengthen reading comprehension skills by making in depth text connections and predictions.  Students will analyze the texts and apply their understanding by answering critical thinking questions. In addition, students will complete one individual written project on each book. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

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Physics

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Science

Course Description: This course is an introduction to major topics in physics, which is the natural science that studies matter, its motion and behavior through space and time, and the related entities of energy and force, including forces and motion, energy, gravity, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. Beginning with kinematics—the quantitative description of motion—the course covers the Newtonian mechanics of point masses, vectors and projectiles, momentum with its collisions, the work-energy principle, power, the conservation of energy and momentum, and a brief look at circular motion and satellite relevance.

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Professional Writing

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: This course covers a multitude of skills required to succeed in the professional world.  Students begin the course learning about word processors such as Microsoft Word. Students will then learn about and create a resume and cover letter for future use.  Students will also create, proofread, and edit their own block-style business letters, memos, narratives, as well as analyze and apply persuasive writing techniques.  By the end of this course, students will be able to successfully apply to schools and jobs while having the necessary skills to successfully communicate in a professional setting. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

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Reading Comprehension

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: English

Course Description: This course was designed to make students a better reader and writer. Throughout the course students will learn about how paragraphs are composed and what to look for to comprehend the main idea and details. Students will also learn how there are different paragraph styles, which give clues to the paragraph’s meaning. Students will practice how to break down a piece of reading and identify the main idea, organizational pattern, and details. Students will have examples and practice exercises along with videos that give a further explanation. This course will familiarize students with the skills and concepts needed to maximize comprehension of short reading passages. Learning and practicing these concepts will help students prepare for entrance to college or the workforce and provide some helpful techniques to use when reading any material. This course will culminate with a Final Exam.

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Transitions 1: Getting into College

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: Students will explore their own personality type, interest inventory, and career interests. Students will explore their options after high school including college and technical careers. Students will create their own resume as well as a personal narrative that could be used for college admissions on the Common Application. They will explore a college application, college admission interview questions, and alternatives to college. By the end of the course, students should have a clear picture of their plans beyond high school.

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Transitions 2: Survival Skills

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Elective

Course Description: This course delves deeper into the topic of transitioning from high school to college.  Exploring their learning style, students will develop personalized study tips based on their learning style. Time management, procrastination, and setting goals will be practiced. Reading techniques, evaluating websites, highlighting, and note taking will be covered. The basics of writing a 5-paragraph essay and incorporating quotes from relevant sources will be incorporated. The course will culminate with test taking strategies.

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U.S. History 1: American History to 1877

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: U.S. History 1 is a comprehensive course that covers United States history from the time of the earliest settlers in North America to the Reconstruction following the Civil War. The course is designed to teach students to think critically about the issues that have confronted and influenced the United States through a process that integrates the examination of factual knowledge, the development and application of analytical skills, and the assessment of primary and secondary sources. Students will demonstrate an understanding in the following areas: colonization of North America, revolution and the emergence of the new nation, expansion and reform of the United States, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

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U.S. History 2: American History from 1877 to Present

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Social Studies

Course Description: U.S. History 2 traces the historical development of the United States of America from the post-Reconstruction period through the early 2000s. It examines political, social, and cultural history, emphasizing industrialization, U.S. expansion, global conflicts, the Civil Rights movement, and the effects of social change. While recounting major events and the contributions of well-known historical figures, the course also examines the role of all Americans in shaping the history of the nation. Students will demonstrate an understanding in the following areas: industrialization and urbanization, immigration, U.S. foreign policies, U.S. roles in global conflicts (WWI and WWII), The Great Depression and New Deal, The Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and issues in modern America.

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Veterinary Technology 1

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational Education & Science

Course Description: This course will cover medical terminology, animal anatomy, and physiology. Students will be exploring systems like the skeletal system, circulatory system, reproductive systems, digestive and nervous systems. This course also covers species terminology and veterinary terminology, as well as abbreviations, prefixes, suffixes and root words. As a culminating activity, students will either interview a veterinarian and write a report about the work that they do or research a veterinarian career and create a presentation.

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Veterinary Technology 2

Prerequisite: None

Credit Requirement Area: Vocational Education & Science

Course Description: This course will cover animal nutrition, restraints, vaccines and radiology, pharmacology and surgery. Throughout the course, students will be looking at the more technical aspects of veterinary medicine and how these areas work together to give the best care to pets and owners. As a culminating activity, students will either interview a specialty veterinarian and write a report about the work that they do or research a veterinarian career and create a presentation.

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